hyperallergic:

(via Film Strips Shining Like Stained Glass)
PORTLAND, Oregon — A cavernous room in an abandoned factory that once made window coverings is showcasing a different kind of window. Artist Jennifer West has installed a set of transparent plexiglass frames covered with strips of 35mm and 70mm film. Viewers are invited to enter this dark space and shine flashlights onto the film strips, casting colored shadows that envelop the room. As visitors tinker with their flashlights, the bright emissions change, intersect, and turn the vast walls into ever-evolving spectacles of dancing light.
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hyperallergic:

(via Film Strips Shining Like Stained Glass)

PORTLAND, Oregon — A cavernous room in an abandoned factory that once made window coverings is showcasing a different kind of window. Artist Jennifer West has installed a set of transparent plexiglass frames covered with strips of 35mm and 70mm film. Viewers are invited to enter this dark space and shine flashlights onto the film strips, casting colored shadows that envelop the room. As visitors tinker with their flashlights, the bright emissions change, intersect, and turn the vast walls into ever-evolving spectacles of dancing light.

READ MORE

(via movingstillpix)

nevver:

Andy, take my picture.

A long way from Hollywood…

fdfjhdfg:

wrekyourself:

fyspringfield:

RIP

Fuck this hurts. Rip.

:(((

(via kmmbig)


"I loved the cinema always, and I loved to go watch movies. But what I saw there was just stupid lies and fake stories. I never saw life and I never saw anything about the people I knew. I never saw real passion, I never saw real emotions, or real camerawork. I never saw a real movie. I thought, if they cannot show me, then I have to do my movie. […] The problem is that most films follow the same pattern: action, cut, action, cut. They only watch the story line. But story is not only about human actions, everything can be a story. A man waiting at a corner can be a story. There are many things that are important in real life but that filmmakers find boring. I don’t think that these things are boring. In my films, I want to be closer to life than to cinema."
Béla TarrBorn July 21, 1955

"I loved the cinema always, and I loved to go watch movies. But what I saw there was just stupid lies and fake stories. I never saw life and I never saw anything about the people I knew. I never saw real passion, I never saw real emotions, or real camerawork. I never saw a real movie. I thought, if they cannot show me, then I have to do my movie. […] The problem is that most films follow the same pattern: action, cut, action, cut. They only watch the story line. But story is not only about human actions, everything can be a story. A man waiting at a corner can be a story. There are many things that are important in real life but that filmmakers find boring. I don’t think that these things are boring. In my films, I want to be closer to life than to cinema."

Béla Tarr
Born July 21, 1955

(Source: strangewood, via kmmbig)

robdelaney:

After Cory Monteith was found dead in his hotel room I tweeted: “Love to Cory Monteith. If drugs/alcohol are killing you, there is help available. I got sober 11 yrs ago at 25. It can be done.”

I got three types of responses. The first were variations of “Thanks for saying that.” The second…

steamboatbilljr:

Joan Crawford prepares to show home movies of her children and friends, 1941

steamboatbilljr:

Joan Crawford prepares to show home movies of her children and friends, 1941

(Source: deforest, via sharontates)

criterioncollection:

Friends and family bid farewell to Les Blank in style.

criterioncollection:

Friends and family bid farewell to Les Blank in style.

oldhollywood:

Cary Grant receiving an Academy Honorary Award in 1970 (online here)
“Years ago, when Cary Grant and Dyan Cannon were getting divorced, a perhaps apocryphal story appeared in the scandal sheets: As an example of Grant’s supposed irrationality, Cannon cited to the judge Cary’s yearly habit of sitting in front of his television and sardonically abusing all the participants. This item, true or not, must have amused nearly everyone in Hollywood, since nearly everyone in Hollywood does pretty much the same thing. 
The funny thing is that from all accounts, when the Academy Awards began in 1939, they were conducted in a similar spirit of irreverence, something that has practically disappeared from the event itself. “They used to have it down at the old Coconut Grove,” Jimmy Stewart told me in the late 70s. “You’d have dinner and alawta drinks - the whole thing was…it was just…it was a party. Nobody took it all that seriously. I mean, it was swell if ya won because your friends were givin’ it to you, but it didn’t mean anything at the bawx office or anything. It was just alawta friends gettin’ together and tellin’ some jokes and gettin’ loaded and givin’ out some little prizes. My gawsh, it was..there was no pressure or anything like that.”
Cary Grant corroborated this to me: ”It was a private affair, you see - no television, no radio, even - just a group of friends giving each other a party. Because, you know, there is something a little embarrassing about all these wealthy people publicly congratulating each other. When it began, we kidded ourselves: ‘All right, Freddie March,’ we’d say, ‘we know you’re making a million dollars - now come up and get your little medal for it!’”
-excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It

oldhollywood:

Cary Grant receiving an Academy Honorary Award in 1970 (online here)

“Years ago, when Cary Grant and Dyan Cannon were getting divorced, a perhaps apocryphal story appeared in the scandal sheets: As an example of Grant’s supposed irrationality, Cannon cited to the judge Cary’s yearly habit of sitting in front of his television and sardonically abusing all the participants. This item, true or not, must have amused nearly everyone in Hollywood, since nearly everyone in Hollywood does pretty much the same thing. 

The funny thing is that from all accounts, when the Academy Awards began in 1939, they were conducted in a similar spirit of irreverence, something that has practically disappeared from the event itself. “They used to have it down at the old Coconut Grove,” Jimmy Stewart told me in the late 70s. “You’d have dinner and alawta drinks - the whole thing was…it was just…it was a party. Nobody took it all that seriously. I mean, it was swell if ya won because your friends were givin’ it to you, but it didn’t mean anything at the bawx office or anything. It was just alawta friends gettin’ together and tellin’ some jokes and gettin’ loaded and givin’ out some little prizes. My gawsh, it was..there was no pressure or anything like that.”

Cary Grant corroborated this to me: ”It was a private affair, you see - no television, no radio, even - just a group of friends giving each other a party. Because, you know, there is something a little embarrassing about all these wealthy people publicly congratulating each other. When it began, we kidded ourselves: ‘All right, Freddie March,’ we’d say, ‘we know you’re making a million dollars - now come up and get your little medal for it!’”

-excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It